GLAUCOMA

glaucoma ophthalmology clinic medic jukic

Glaucoma is a group of eye diseases that damage the optic nerve, the health of which is critical to good vision. This damage is often caused by abnormally high pressure in the eye.

Glaucoma is one of the most common causes of blindness in people over the age of 60. It can occur at any age, but is more common in the elderly. Many forms of glaucoma have no warning signs. The effect is so gradual that you may not notice any change in vision until the disease is in an advanced stage.

Since vision loss from glaucoma cannot be compensated for, it is important to have regular eye exams, which include measurements of eye pressure, so that a diagnosis can be made early and treated appropriately. If glaucoma is caught early, vision loss can be slowed or stopped.

It is a decay of the optic nerve and nerve fibers of the retina, usually accompanied by increased intraocular pressure. It is the most common cause of blindness in the world after cataracts.

Although intraocular pressure is cited as the primary cause of glaucoma, glaucoma can also occur as a secondary condition due to severe eye inflammation, surgery, or other eye trauma. Glaucoma is the leading cause of irreversible vision loss worldwide, and approximately 4.5 million people are blind due to the effects of this disease.

There are different types of glaucoma and they are:

* primary

* secondary

* open angle

* closed angle

The imbalance of water formation in the eye and swelling of the eye cause primary glaucoma and other eye diseases like severe inflammation, eye trauma etc cause secondary glaucoma.

Regular checkup of glaucoma includes two routine eye examinations: tonometry and ophthalmoscopy.

Tonometry

Tonometry involves measuring the pressure in the eye. During tonometry, eye drops are used to numb the eye. Then the doctor or technician uses a device called a tonometer to measure intraocular pressure. He presses down a small device using an even smaller device or warm air.

The normal pressure range is 12-22 mm Hg ("mm Hg" refers to millimeters of mercury, the scale used to record intraocular pressure). Most cases of glaucoma are diagnosed at pressures greater than 20 mm Hg. However, some people may have glaucoma at a pressure between 12 -22 mm Hg. Each person's eye pressure is unique.

Ophthalmoscopy

This agnostic procedure allows your doctor to examine your optic nerve for glaucoma damage. Eye drops are used to dilate the pupil so the doctor can see the shape and color of the optic nerve through your eye. The doctor will then use a small device with a light on the end to illuminate and magnify the optic nerve. If your eye pressure (IOP) is not within normal limits or if your optic nerve looks unusual, your doctor may ask you to have one or two more glaucoma tests: perimetry and gonioscopy.

Perimeter

Perimetry is a visual field test that creates a map of your entire field of vision. This test helps your doctor determine if your vision is affected by glaucoma. During this test, you will be asked to look straight ahead while a dot of light appears repeatedly in different areas of your peripheral vision. After a glaucoma diagnosis, visual field tests are usually performed once or twice a year to check if your vision is changing.

Gonioscopy

This diagnostic exam helps determine if the angle at which the iris meets the cornea is open and wide or narrow and closed. Eye drops are used during the exam to numb the eye. The hand-held contact lens is carefully placed on the eye. This contact lens has a mirror that indicates to the doctor whether the angle between the iris and cornea is closed and obstructed (possible sign of angle closure or acute glaucoma) or wide and open (possible sign of chronic open-angle glaucoma) .

Pachymetry

Pachymetry is a simple, painless test to measure corneal thickness. A probe called a pachymeter is gently placed on the front of the eye (cornea) to measure its thickness. Pachymetry can help you make a diagnosis because corneal thickness can affect eye pressure readings. With this measurement, your doctor can better understand your IOP reading and develop a treatment plan that fits you. The procedure only takes about a minute to measure both eyes.

Why are there so many diagnostic tests for glaucoma?

Diagnosing glaucoma is not always easy, and careful evaluation of vision remains critical to diagnosis and treatment. The most important concern is protecting vision. The team at Medic Jukic examines many factors before deciding your treatment.

Damage caused by glaucoma cannot be reversed. But treatment and regular checkups can help slow or prevent vision loss, especially if you discover the disease at an early stage.

Glaucoma is treated by lowering eye pressure (intraocular pressure). Depending on your situation, your options may include eyelids, oral medications, laser treatment, surgery, or a combination of the above. The team at Medic Jukic will find the best solution for your eyes.

Glaucoma treatment often begins with eye drops. They can help lower eye pressure by improving fluid drainage from the eye or reducing the amount of fluid your eye makes. If the eye drops do not lower your eye pressure to the desired level, your doctor may also prescribe an oral medication, usually a carbonic anhydrase inhibitor. Other treatment options include laser therapy and various surgeries.

Minimally invasive glaucoma surgery (MIGS) to lower intraocular pressure. These procedures usually require less immediate postoperative care and have a lower risk of trabeculectomy or installation of a drainage device. They are often combined with retinal surgery. There are numerous MIGS techniques available.

Acute narrow-angle glaucoma is a medical emergency If you are diagnosed with this condition, you will need emergency treatment to lower your eye pressure. This usually requires medication and a laser or other surgical procedure.

Glaucoma is also known as the "thief of passion" because of its lack of symptoms and slow progression. Thus, 50% of patients in developed countries do not know that they have glaucoma, while this figure is about 90% in underdeveloped countries. Medic Jukić Eye Clinic offers you a complete and thorough ophthalmological examination as one of the forms of glaucoma prevention. Turn to us with confidence, because the health of your eyesight comes first.

glaucoma ophthalmology clinic medic jukic 01

Glaucoma is a group of eye diseases that damage the optic nerve, the health of which is critical to good vision. This damage is often caused by abnormally high pressure in the eye.

Glaucoma is one of the most common causes of blindness in people over the age of 60. It can occur at any age, but is more common in the elderly. Many forms of glaucoma have no warning signs. The effect is so gradual that you may not notice any change in vision until the disease is in an advanced stage.

Since vision loss from glaucoma cannot be compensated for, it is important to have regular eye exams, which include measurements of eye pressure, so that a diagnosis can be made early and treated appropriately. If glaucoma is caught early, vision loss can be slowed or stopped.

It is a decay of the optic nerve and nerve fibers of the retina, usually accompanied by increased intraocular pressure. It is the most common cause of blindness in the world after cataracts.

Although intraocular pressure is cited as the primary cause of glaucoma, glaucoma can also occur as a secondary condition due to severe eye inflammation, surgery, or other eye trauma. Glaucoma is the leading cause of irreversible vision loss worldwide, and approximately 4.5 million people are blind due to the effects of this disease.

There are different types of glaucoma and they are:

* primary

* secondary

* open angle

* closed angle

The imbalance of water formation in the eye and swelling of the eye cause primary glaucoma and other eye diseases like severe inflammation, eye trauma etc. cause secondary glaucoma.

Regular checkup of glaucoma includes two routine eye examinations: tonometry and ophthalmoscopy.

Tonometry

Tonometry involves measuring the pressure in the eye. During tonometry, eye drops are used to numb the eye. Then the doctor or technician uses a device called a tonometer to measure intraocular pressure. He presses down a small device using an even smaller device or warm air.

The normal pressure range is 12-22 mm Hg ("mm Hg" refers to millimeters of mercury, the scale used to record intraocular pressure). Most cases of glaucoma are diagnosed at pressures greater than 20 mm Hg. However, some people may have glaucoma at a pressure between 12 -22 mm Hg. Each person's eye pressure is unique.

Ophthalmoscopy

This agnostic procedure allows your doctor to examine your optic nerve for glaucoma damage. Eye drops are used to dilate the pupil so the doctor can see the shape and color of the optic nerve through your eye. The doctor will then use a small device with a light on the end to illuminate and magnify the optic nerve. If your eye pressure (IOP) is not within normal limits or if your optic nerve looks unusual, your doctor may ask you to have one or two more glaucoma tests: perimetry and gonioscopy.

Perimeter

Perimetry is a visual field test that creates a map of your entire field of vision. This test helps your doctor determine if your vision is affected by glaucoma. During this test, you will be asked to look straight ahead while a dot of light appears repeatedly in different areas of your peripheral vision. After a glaucoma diagnosis, visual field tests are usually performed once or twice a year to check if your vision is changing.

Gonioscopy

This diagnostic exam helps determine if the angle at which the iris meets the cornea is open and wide or narrow and closed. Eye drops are used during the exam to numb the eye. The hand-held contact lens is carefully placed on the eye. This contact lens has a mirror that indicates to the doctor whether the angle between the iris and cornea is closed and obstructed (possible sign of angle closure or acute glaucoma) or wide and open (possible sign of chronic open-angle glaucoma) .

Pachymetry

Pachymetry is a simple, painless test to measure corneal thickness. A probe called a pachymeter is gently placed on the front of the eye (cornea) to measure its thickness. Pachymetry can help you make a diagnosis because corneal thickness can affect eye pressure readings. With this measurement, your doctor can better understand your IOP reading and develop a treatment plan that fits you. The procedure only takes about a minute to measure both eyes.

Why are there so many diagnostic tests for glaucoma?

Diagnosing glaucoma is not always easy, and careful evaluation of vision remains critical to diagnosis and treatment. The most important concern is protecting vision.

The team at Medic Jukic examines many factors before deciding your treatment.

Damage caused by glaucoma cannot be reversed. But treatment and regular checkups can help slow or prevent vision loss, especially if you discover the disease at an early stage.

Glaucoma is treated by lowering eye pressure (intraocular pressure). Depending on your situation, your options may include eyelids, oral medications, laser treatment, surgery, or a combination of the above. The team at Medic Jukic will find the best solution for your eyes.

Glaucoma treatment often begins with eye drops. They can help lower eye pressure by improving fluid drainage from the eye or reducing the amount of fluid your eye makes. If the eye drops do not lower your eye pressure to the desired level, your doctor may also prescribe an oral medication, usually a carbonic anhydrase inhibitor. Other treatment options include laser therapy and various surgeries.

Minimally invasive glaucoma surgery (MIGS) to lower intraocular pressure. These procedures usually require less immediate postoperative care and have a lower risk of trabeculectomy or installation of a drainage device. They are often combined with retinal surgery. There are numerous MIGS techniques available.

Acute narrow-angle glaucoma is a medical emergency If you are diagnosed with this condition, you will need emergency treatment to lower your eye pressure. This usually requires medication and a laser or other surgical procedure.

Glaucoma is also known as the "thief of passion" because of its lack of symptoms and slow progression. Thus, 50% of patients in developed countries do not know that they have glaucoma, while this figure is about 90% in underdeveloped countries. Medic Jukić Eye Clinic offers you a complete and thorough ophthalmological examination as one of the forms of glaucoma prevention. Turn to us with confidence, because the health of your eyesight comes first.

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